Biomaterials

Molecular Modeling of Elasticity of Spider Silk and Related Biopolymers (TA / FA)

In this project, the aim is to understand quantitatively the molecular elasticity of biopolymers with potential engineering applications. The first example is Spider Dragline Silk, which may be several times stronger than steel (after normalizing the density). The work involves experimental, computational and theoretical analyses of the molecular structure of the biopolymer system.

Pancreas on a chip to understand nanoparticle mediated drug delivery for killing of pancreatic cancer-cells

Pancreatic cancer is one of the cancers having the lowest 5-year survival rate, because of its late diagnosis and availability of only a couple of known drugs with very moderate increase in patient’s survival. Based on our earlier work, we have shown that, nanoparticle mediated delivery of existing drugs can enhance the cytotoxicity in cancer cells.

Understanding the role of Substrate Rheology on Cell Fate

In this project the candidate is expected to prepare various materials, estimates their rheological properties, and then explore the effect of rheological properties on cell fate in the context of stem cell differentiation and cancer. This project will supervised jointly by Prof. Jyoti Seth and Prof. Abhijit Majumder. To get a flavor of the work, interested candidate may look at the following papers:

Molecular Modeling of Elasticity of Spider Silk and Related Biopolymers (TA / FA)

In this project, the aim is to understand quantitatively the molecular elasticity of biopolymers with potential engineering applications. The first example is Spider Dragline Silk, which may be several times stronger than steel (after normalizing the density). The work involves experimental, computational and theoretical analyses of the molecular structure of the biopolymer system.

Zebrafish and embryo models for nanomedicine studies

Objectives: To develop zebrafish based models for understanding action of nanomedicines including Ayurvedic and Homeopathic ones. To test them by physico-chemical and biological means: in-vitro in mammalian cell culture, in-vivo in small animals and fish, fish embryos, and behavioral studies. Studies will include medicines across multiple systems of medicine and mainly experimental with some model building and simulations.

Simulation and fabrication of resorbable occlusion devices for surgery

Objectives: To develop customized devices for closing holes in hearts and other tissue repair with 3D printing and newer methods of fabrication for bio-resorbable polymers. To test them by computer simulations and by physico-chemical and biological means: in-vitro in mammalian cell culture and in-vivo in small animals, and perhaps first-in-human.

Scaffolds for regenerative medicine

To develop customized grafts for bone and other tissue with 3D printing and other fabrication technologies, and to develop new methods of fabrication for bio-resorbable scaffolds. To test them by physico-chemical and biological means: in-vitro in mammalian cell culture, in-vivo in small animals, and perhaps first-in-human.

The phase behavior of connected hard and soft particles.

A surprising new development in materials science and chemical engineering is the finding that mixtures of hard (colloidal), and soft (polymeric, or micellar) particles can self organize on length scales much larger than the diameter of either species.  In this project we explore the behavior of connected hard- and soft particles.  An elementary knowledge of coding is sufficient.