Colloids

Simulations for studying self-assembly in polymeric systems

Unlike neutral polymers, charged polymers (polyelectrolytes) such as DNA, and proteins are promising nanomaterials for designing bioengineering platforms required for controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering/cell attachment, bio-conjugation, etc. Synthetic polyelectrolytes have also been used for above-mentioned applications due to their ease of availability and low cost. They have also been utilized in textiles, cosmetics, detergents, pharmaceutical, paints and pigments industries.  read more »

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Biomaterials
  • Colloids
  • Drug Delivery
  • Molecular Simulations
  • Polymer Physics
  • Rheology

Nanoparticle based systems and devices for drug delivery in cancer (TA or FA topic)

We have successfully synthesized different solid and porous nanoparticles in our laboratory with controlled pore size, high specific surface area and different surface properties. These particles have been loaded with different drugs, like, doxorubicin, gemcitabine, curcumin for cancer-treatment and rifampicin, isoniazid and norfloxacin for tuberculosis-treatment.  read more »

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Adsorption
  • Biochemical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Coatings
  • Colloids
  • Drug Delivery
  • Nano-composites
  • Nanoparticles
  • Surface Science

Functional Nanoparticles: Experiments, modeling, simulation (TA or FA topic)

Nanoparticles and their clusters show new and interesting properties different from bulk
materials due to their extremely small size (diameter) and large specific
surface area. It is thus critical to understand the variables that control
its formation leading to a desired property. Control of nanoparticle size,  read more »

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Colloids
  • Computational Flow Modelling (CFD)
  • Molecular Simulations
  • Nano-composites
  • Nanoparticles
  • Reactor Modelling
  • Surface Science
  • Surfactants

Sensing and removal of pollutants from water (TA or FA topic)

This research involves primarily experimental work to both detect environmental pollutants (by developing sensors) and remove them from water. This includes pollutants of different classes, like metals, organic dyes; and even contaminants, like bacteria etc. The aim is to both sense and remove the pollutants by use of nanoparticles and hybrid nanomaterials.  read more »

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Colloids
  • Nano-composites
  • Nanoparticles
  • Product Development
  • Surface Science
  • Thin films

Measurement of Diffusiophoretic Velocities of Colloidal Particles

Diffusiophoresis is the motion of colloidal or microscopic particles under the influence of a concentration gradient of smaller molecules. Recently, we have shown that a diffusiophoretic motion of colloidal particles can lead to increased mass transfer. Such enhancements may help in better and efficient contacting for chemical reactions, particularly in microreactors. Thus far there were no reliable measurements of diffusiophoretic velocities, particularly of colloidal particles.  read more »

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Colloids
  • Heat and Mass Transfer

Liposomal Drug Delivery System

Stationary Phase Interdiffusion is a new technique to make liposomes of uniform diameter. Currently adopted methods for encapsulating drugs using this method is very inefficient (less than 5%), whereas it can theoretically be as high as 80%). This study will focus on improving the encapsulation efficiency by first understanding the reasons of poor efficiency, and adopting techniques used elsewhere to increase the efficiency of encapsulation. The study will be potentially be carried out in collaboration with a pharma industry, with a possibility of carrying out an internship there.

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Colloids
  • Drug Delivery
  • Nanoparticles
  • Product Development
  • Surfactants

Film formation and anti-microbial studies of nano-composite coatings (Joint supervision with Prof. Mahesh Tirumkudulu)

Preventing or
inhibiting the growth of micro-organisms on surfaces is of prime importance in
the healthcare and textile industries. A promising strategy to overcome
microbial growth involves coating the surfaces with materials that can provide
resistance to microbial colonization. Inorganic nano materials and organic
materials with inorganic inclusions are being widely used as anti-microbial  read more »

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Coatings
  • Colloids

The phase behavior of connected hard and soft particles.

A surprising new development in materials science and chemical engineering is the finding that mixtures of hard (colloidal), and soft (polymeric, or micellar) particles can self organize in length scale much larger than the diameter of either species.  In this project we explore the behavior of connected hard- and soft particles.  An elementary knowledge of coding is sufficient.

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Biomaterials
  • Colloids
  • Molecular Simulations
  • Nano-composites
  • Nanoparticles
  • Polymer Physics
  • Statistical Themodynamics
  • Surface Science

The role of impurities in the self-assembly of polymer-grafted nanoparticles.

Traditionally, self-assembled structures are formed using chemical differences within a species.  Examples of this are the formation of micelles by detergents, and the formation of the phospholipid bilayer of the cell membrane.  In these systems, it is the tendency to the hydrophobic and hydrophilic part to avoid each other that result in the  self-assembled state.  However, a recent study (http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2017/sm/c7sm00230k) has pointed out that it is possible to form self-assembled states without any chemical differences.  This project focuses on how the prese  read more »

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Colloids
  • Molecular Simulations
  • Nano-composites
  • Nanoparticles
  • Polymer Physics
  • Statistical Themodynamics

The role of shape in the self-assembly of polymer-grafted nanoparticles.

Traditionally, self-assembled structures are formed using chemical differences within a species.  Examples of this are the formation of micelles by detergents, and the formation of the phospholipid bilayer of the cell membrane.  In these systems it is the tendency to the hydrophobic and hydrophilic part to avoid each other that result in the self-assembled state.  However, a recent study (http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2017/sm/c7sm00230k) has pointed out that it is possible to form self-assembled states without any chemical differences.  Rather, it is possible to form such stru  read more »

Proposing Faculty
Research Area
  • Colloids
  • Nano-composites
  • Nanoparticles
  • Polymer Physics
  • Statistical Themodynamics